65 years ago today, Rosa Parks stood up for civil rights by sitting down

65 years ago today, Rosa Parks stood up for civil rights by sitting down

Jannah Al Defaaei, Writer

On December 1, 1955, Rosa Parks became a symbol in America’s Civil Rights movement by sitting down. It was when she refused to give up her seat to a white passenger on a bus in Montgomery, Alabama that helped end segregation laws in the south.

Many of us have known this story from a young age, and we subconsciously remember it and hold the morals and values it taught.

A bus filled up while Rosa Parks was sitting towards the front of the bus. The driver demanded that she give up her seat to a white passenger, but she refused. This surprised people, but empowered many more. 

For refusing to give up a seat, she was arrested and later convicted of disorderly conduct. Following this, a 381-day boycott of the bus system was led by Martin Luther King Jr. 

This case went to the supreme court, and it resulted in a ruling that desegregated public transportation in Montgomery. In 1964, the Civil Rights Act would desegregate public accommodations nationwide.

Refusing to give up a seat seems like a very minor thing to us, however it had one of the biggest impacts toward freedom and unity in the United States.